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Workshops

From prison to power

Michael Eric Dyson Show - National Public Radio® WEAA-FM Baltimore

In 2004, award-winning journalist Patrice Gaines teamed up with her good friend Gaile Dry-Burton to open the Brown Angel Center. Together, they run monthly workshops for imprisoned women in Charlotte. The two help inspire women to reflect on their past decisions and find the tools to move forward. Gaines is a former reporter for the Washington Post and the author of Laughing in the Dark and Moments of Grace: Meeting the Challenge to Change.

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Snapshot: Good Cooking, Better Memories

National Public Radio®
FARAI CHIDEYA, Host

From the world of high tech to the slower side of life, we head to Lake Wylie, South Carolina. That's where former Washington Post reporter Patrice Gaines wrote today's Snapshot. Patrice remembers how generations of good cooking shaped her own sense of family.

Ms. PATRICE GAINES (Former Reporter, Washington Post):
My grandmother made perfect biscuits - soft, flaky, golden on top. She made big pans of her biscuits for me whenever I visited her in Washington, D.C. She pulls them out of the oven and placed them lovingly on a dinner plate. She'd bring them to me along with a smaller saucer, a bottle of dark caramel syrup or Brer Rabbit Molasses. I'd slather the biscuits with butter, poured syrup or molasses into the saucer and use the bread to sop it up. I was in my 20s. I didn't have to think about my waistline.

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Snapshots: Setting Sail on "D.C. Homegirls"

National Public Radio®
FARAI CHIDEYA, Host

This summer, she's trying her best to stay cool. She's also been thinking about family and what it means to be a modern black woman.

Ms. PATRICE GAINES, Washington Post):
When I was growing up, my mother and grandmother occasionally said with great love, you've got to be three times better than white people just to be treated equally. The first time I really felt the weight of their words, I was the only little black girl in my kindergarten class and I'd peed by pants. It was just an accident, but I felt like I've embarrassed all the descendants of African people. How would they ever recover?

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Snapshot: Putting the 'Patrice' in P-Funk

National Public Radio®
FARAI CHIDEYA, Host

Patrice GainesA few weeks ago, we introduced you to Patrice Gaines. She used to be an award-winning reporter for the Washington Post, but she burned out on big city life, packed her bags and moved to small town Lake Wylie, South Carolina.

There is just one catch - she's black and Lake Wylie is almost entirely white. That's made for some interesting and fun cross-cultural experiences.

Ms. PATRICE GAINES (Award-winning Reporter):
As part of my 58th birthday celebration, my sister Carole, my friend, Jeanette and I, decided to see George Clinton and Parliament-Funkadelic. Fans of the group are called funkateers, and we four women consider ourselves among the most faithful funkateers around.

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Patrice Reads Poem Entitled "9/11"
on WPFW Pacifica Radio

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Patrice Reads Poem Entitled "The Peacemakers"
On WPFW Pacifica Radio

Copyright©2011 Patrice Gaines Email: info@patricegaines.com
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